Impact/Value

How the Minnesota Chorale Bounced Back from an Orchestra Shutdown

What happens when a long-time relationship with an orchestra goes away—taking with it a third of your organization's income?  Shock, dismay, and then a determination to rally around your core mission.

Every year, the movie awards season celebrates the best in film and acting. This year, we compiled our own list of nominations: the top films that should be on every choral music lover’s must-see list. The suggestions we received range from new releases to classic films and from light entertainment to inspiring stories. How many of these movies have you seen? What other titles do you think should make the list?

As a young girl, Abbie Betinis noticed that singing “Caroling, Caroling” during the holidays always brought tears to her grandpa’s eyes. Later she would learn that the famous carol was one of many composed by her great uncle Alfred Burt, who was carrying on a family tradition of carol writing begun by his father, the Rev. Bates Burt. In 2001, Betinis, by then a composer herself, decided to pick up the family carol writing tradition.

In celebration of the Britten centennial in 2013, this issue of American Choral Review features two articles on the music of Benjamin Britten: distinguished scholar Alfred Whittall offers reflections on the composer’s choral writing, and co-authors Thomas Folan and Nancy S. Niemi explore issues of identity in Britten’s Cantata Academica.

A girl. A story. A song.

For the composing team of Paul Caldwell and Sean Ivory, inspiration usually comes in the form of a story that grabs them and won’t let go. Such was the case with “Beneath the African Sky”—a lullaby for a lost refugee girl that has become a cry for justice and a song of hope for children’s choruses around the world.

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